Demolition Derby
Evolutionary Art
GPUs for Genetic and Evolutionary Computation
Simulated Car Racing Championship
Visualizing Evolution Competition
Industrial Challenge
 

COMPETITIONS:

Demolition Derby

Organizers:

Martin V. Butz, University of Würzburg, Germany
Matthias J. Linhardt, University of Würzburg, Germany
Daniele Loiacono, Politecnico di Milano, Italy
Luigi Cardamone, Politecnico di Milano, Italy
Pier Luca Lanzi, Politecnico di Milano, Italy

Goal:

The Demolition Derby 2011 competition challenges you to design a racing car controller that manages to effectively crash into other cars while avoiding being crashed itself. Thus, the goal is simple: Wreck all opponent cars by crashing into them without getting wrecked yourself.

Demolition Derby takes place on a large circular track (surface: asphalt, length: 640m, width: 90m, number of laps: 1000). The sensor information is egocentric fostering the design and optimization of local interaction routines.

The last car standing is declared winner of the match.

Rules and Scoring:

The most important sensors and actuators of the competition are:

  1. 36 noiseless opponent sensors with a range of 300m indicate the presence of opponents around the own car.
  2. 19 noiseless track edge distance sensors (200m range) indicate the local track outline.
  3. Other track information sensors indicate the orientation on the track as well as the locality with respect to the track edges.
  4. Car state sensors indicate the current speed, gear, rpm of the engine, as well as the wheel speeds.
  5. Damage sensors indicate the current own damage as well as the damage induced to other cars.
  6. Actuators include all usual car control options (using the clutch, changing gears, accelerating, breaking, steering).

The damage model is such that the goal is to crash into other cars coming from the side or behind. Front crashes as well as crashes into walls do not result in damage. This is done to foster strategic driving and to decrease randomness in the results.

All racing controllers participating in Demolition Derby have to qualify for the final showdown match by competing with each other in preliminary 1-vs-1-matches. The best eight controllers then fight each other at the same time in ten final matches. The car that wins most often in these final matches will be the Winner of the Demolition Derby Competition.

Participation is open to anybody. You do not need to participate in the conference to send an entry. However, the price will be received by the best competitor that also participates in the conference.

Submission:

Please send your controller per email with subject line [demolition derby entry] to the following address:



Required files for Java Users: Please send the necessary sources and compiled .class-files. Clarify in the text of your mail which class file is the main that is to be started.
Required files for C++ Users: Please send the source files necessary to compile the code to us.
Please include your full name and address (and optionally affiliation) in the mail as well as an indicative name for your controller (to be used in the competition rankings).

Deadline:

The submission deadline is July 07, 2011.

Further Information and Getting Started:

Further information, a manual, and links to downloads can be found at: http://www.coboslab.psychologie.uni-wuerzburg.de/competitions/

See also the self-explanatory video of what this competition is about at: http://www.youtube.com/user/COBOSLAB

You may also send an email to for further inquiries or visit the Car Racing Google Group at:
http://groups.google.com/group/racingcompetition

 

 

Evolutionary Art

Organizers:

Christian Gagné, Université Laval
Alain Lioret, Université Paris VIII
Penousal Machado, Universidade de Coimbra

This competition invites conference participants to demonstrate that genetic and evolutionary computation can be applied to create impressive and provocative works of art. The competition will identify the best work, be it an image, a sculpture, a music score, a video, an interactive online experience, or a system that exhibits some form of independent creativity.

Entry Submission

Entrants must submit: (1) a brief artistic statement illustrating the concept, (2) a short paper describing the technical details, and (3) a set of multimedia -files to illustrate the result of the evolutionary process. Artists can either submit five still images, or a video of up to 5 minutes, or a sound -file of up to 5 minutes. All submissions should be sent to by June 17, 2011.

Evaluation

The submissions will be evaluated by a jury of researchers from the evolutionary computation and the technological arts communities, who will evaluate the submissions on the following four criteria:
originality, artistic quality, technical quality, and relevance to evolutionary art and the goals of the competition.

Presentation

Finalists selected by the jury will be invited to present their submission at the competition session, held during the GECCO conference.
The winner of the competition will be announced at the SIGEVO meeting ceremony, on July 16, 2011.

Important Dates

* Submission deadline: June 17, 2011
* Conference: July 12-16, 2011

Jury

* Matthew Lewis, ACCAD, Ohio State University
* Jon McCormack, Centre for Electronic Media Art, Monash University
* Gary Lee Nelson, Santa Fe University of Art and Design
* Craig Reynolds, Sony Computer Entertainment, US R&D
* Juan Romero, Faculty of Computer Science, University of A Coruna
* Jeffrey Ventrella, independent artist/researcher


 

 

GPUs for Genetic and Evolutionary Computation
Organizers:

Simon Harding, IDSIA, Switzerland
Additional organizers are to be determined

Goal:

This competition focuses on the applications of genetic and evolutionary computation that can maximally exploit the parallelism provided by low-cost consumer graphical cards. The competition will award the best applications both in terms of degree of parallelism obtained, in terms of overall speed-up, and in terms of programming style.

Rules and Scoring:

Entrants must submit (1) the application sources with the instructions to compile it and (2) a two page description of the application. Submissions will be reviewed by a committee of researchers from the evolutionary computation community and from industry. Each reviewer will score the submission according to 12 criteria concerning the submitted algorithm, the speed-up it achieves, and its impact on the evolutionary computation community. The total score will be obtained as the weighted sum of the 12 separate scores. The scoring system will be announced shortly!

Submissions should be mailed to no later than June 23rd, 2011. The final scores will be announced during GECCO. Important Dates:

Submission deadline: June 23rd, 2011

Conference: July 12th-16th 2011

Further Information

http://www.gpgpgpu.com/gecco2011/

Previous Competitions

http://www.gpgpgpu.com/gecco2009/
http://www.gpgpgpu.com/gecco2010/

 

 

Simulated Car Racing Championship

Organizers:

Daniele Loiacono, Politecnico di Milano, Italy
Luigi Cardamone, Politecnico di Milano, Italy
Martin V. Butz, University of Würzburg, Germany
Pier Luca Lanzi, Politecnico di Milano, Italy

Goal:

The goal of the championship is to design a controller for a racing car that will compete on a set of unknown tracks first alone (against the clock) and then against other drivers.
The controllers perceive the racing environment through a number of sensors that describe the relevant features of the car surroundings (e.g., the track limits, the position of near-by obstacles), of the car state (the engine RPMs, the current gear, wheel speeds, etc.), and the current game state (lap time, number of lap, etc.). The controller can perform the typical driving actions (clutch, changing gear, accelerate, break, steering the wheel).

Rules & Scoring:

The championship consists of several races on different tracks divided into legs. Teams will be allowed to submit a different driver to each leg.

Each Grand Prix consists of three stages:

1) the warm-up,
2) the qualifying, and
3) the actual race

During warm-up, each driver races alone. At this stage, drivers can collect useful information about the tracks and can tune their behavior for the next stages. Accordingly, the performance of drivers in this stage is not taken into account for their scores.

During the qualifying stage each driver races alone on each track of the leg. The eight controllers that bridge the longest distances qualify for the actual Grand Prix races.

During the final races, these best eight drivers race together. The races consist of eight runs on each of the three tracks. At the end of each race, the drivers are scored using the F1 system: 10 points to the first controller that completes the race, 8 points to the second one, 6 to the third one, 5 to the fourth, 4 to the fifth one, 3 to the sixth, 2 to the seventh, and 1 to the eighth. The driver performing the fastest lap in the race will get two additional points. The driver completing the race with the smallest amount of damage will also get two extra points. The starting grid of the first race will be based on the performance obtained in the qualifying stage. Each subsequent race, the starting grid will be shifted by one so that each driver starts from every position of the starting grid exactly once.

Deadline:

The submission deadline is July 01, 2011.

Further Information:

http://cig.ws.dei.polimi.it/

You may also send an email to for further inquiries or visit the Car Racing Google Group at:
http://groups.google.com/group/racingcompetition

 

 

Visualizing Evolution Competition

Organizers:

Nicholas Sinnott-Armstrong, Dartmouth Medical School
Jason Moore, Dartmouth Medical School

Goal:

This competition aims to enable participants to exhibit their cutting edge visualizations of evolutionary processes. The competition is a general set of guidelines and a framework within which a variety of visualization and interaction technologies can be used to portray current work in evolutionary computing in a compelling and elucidating manner. Hopefully, by visualizing these processes and applying techniques from scientific visualization and visual analytics, new insights and a broader understanding will be achieved.

Rules:

The Visualizing Evolution Competition submission guidelines require the submission of a program and relevant data that can be used to elucidate some aspect of the EC community. The data must be collected from running an evolutionary computing algorithm, or can be input to such a program running as part of the visualization system. The materials required for submission are as follows:

1) The application program and any instructions necessary to install and run it.
2) Test data for the application.
3) A two page writeup describing the application, the evolutionary process being modeled, and any insights gained through use of the program.

Scoring:

The submissions will be scored by a community panel (TBA), which will judge based on the criteria of originality, quality, and applicability, described below:

1) Originality: This criterion is primarily to show that a submission is unique and creative.
2) Quality: A submission high in this criterion would be visually appealing, easy to interact with, and easy to interpret.
3) Applicability: This is primarily to evaluate a submission on its ability to visualize data relevant to real world tests in the EC community.

Submission Deadline:

The submission deadline is July 01, 2011.
All submissions should be sent to

Industrial Challenge

For more info, please visit:

http://gociop.de/gecco-2011-industrial-challenge/

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