INFORMATION

Please send inquiries regarding workshops by e-mail to the workshop chair Jano van Hemert

Proceedings of the workshops will be published on CD-ROM, and distributed at the conference.
Call for workshop proposals, which was closed on 28 October, 2006.

OVERVIEW

Medical Applications of Genetic and Evolutionary Computation Workshop (MedGEC)
Stephen L. Smith & Stefano Cagnoni

Biological applications of Genetic and Evolutionary Computation (BioGEC)
Jason Moore & Marylyn Ritchie
User-centric Evolutionary Computation Workshop
Ian Parmee
Optimization by Building and Using Probabilistic Models (OBUPM)
Peter Bosman , Jörn Grahl , Kumara Sastry & Martin Pelikan
Military and Security Applications of Evolutionary Computation
Laurence Merkle , Misty Blowers & Stephen C. Upton
Undergraduate Student Workshop
Laurence Merkle , Clare Bates Congdon & Frank Moore
Learning Classifier Systems (LCS)
Tim Kovacs , Xavier Llorà & Keiki Takadama
Adaptive Representations
Marc Toussaint & Edwin de Jong
Complexity through Development and Self-Organizing Representations (CODESOAR)
(previously known as SEEDS)
Julian Miller , Ivan Garibay , Sanjeev Kumar , Ozlem Garibay & Kivanc Oner

ABSTRACTS

Medical Applications of Genetic and Evolutionary Computation Workshop (MedGEC)
Stephen L. Smith & Stefano Cagnoni
Duration: Half Day

[ further details ]
 
The Workshop will focus on the application of genetic and evolutionary computation (GEC) to problems in medicine and healthcare, and.provide a forum in which researchers can discuss and exchange ideas, support and advise each other in theory and practice.

Subjects will include (but are not limited to) applications of GEC to: Medical imaging; Medical signal processing; Clinical diagnosis and therapy; Data mining medical data and records; Clinical expert systems; Modeling, and simulation of medical processes.

Accepted papers will be considered for inclusion in a special issue of the journal "Genetic Programming and Evolvable Machines".
 
 
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Biological applications of Genetic and Evolutionary Computation (BioGEC)
Jason Moore & Marylyn Ritchie
Duration: Full Day

[ further details ]
 
The fifth annual workshop on Biological applications of Genetic and Evolutionary Computation (BioGEC) is intended to explore and critically evaluate the application of GEC to a wide range of biological problems. Specifically, the goal is to bring biologists and computer scientists together to foster an exchange of ideas that will yield emergent properties that will move the field forward in unpredictable ways. We propose below a new format for the 2006 BioGEC workshop that will explicitly bring computer scientists together with biologists to foster interaction.
 
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User-centric Evolutionary Computation Workshop
Ian Parmee
Duration: Half Day

[ further details ]

Interactive evolutionary computing, in the main, relates to partial or complete human evaluation of the fitness of solutions generated from evolutionary search. This has been introduced where quantitative evaluation is difficult if not impossible to achieve. Examples of application include graphic arts and animation; food engineering and hazard icon design. Such applications rely upon a human-centred, subjective evaluation of the fitness of a particular design, image, taste etc as opposed to an evaluation developed from some analytic model.
Partial human interaction that complements quantitative machine-based solution evaluation is also in evidence. For instance, the user addition of new constraints in order to generate solutions that are fully satisfactory within evolutionary scheduling systems or the introduction of designer-generated solutions into selected evolving generations.
Solutions can also provide information to the user which supports a better understanding of the problem domain whilst helping to identify best direction for future investigation especially when operating within poorly defined problem spaces. This supports development of the problem representation in an iterative, interactive evolutionary design and decision-making environment. Such human-centric approaches generate and succinctly present information appertaining to complex relationships between the variables, objectives and constraints that define a decision space.
In an attempt to categorise these various forms of IEC it is possible to view complete human evaluation as explicit whereas partial evaluation and interaction are less explicit, more subtle forms of human involvement. Completely implicit interaction occurs where users are unaware of their role in the evolution of a system e.g. the on-line evolution of web-based tutorials based upon the manner users are navigating the system and their associated degree of success. A simple implicit/explicit spectrum of interactive evolutionary approaches can thus be developed.


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Optimization by Building and Using Probabilistic Models (OBUPM)
Peter Bosman, Jörn Grahl, Kumara Sastry & Martin Pelikan
Duration: Half Day
 
Genetic- and evolutionary algorithms (GEAs) evolve a population of candidate solutions to a given optimization problem using two basic operators: (1) selection and (2) variation. Selection introduces a pressure toward high-quality solutions, whereas variation ensures exploration of the space of all potential solutions. Two variation operators are common in current genetic{ and evolutionary computation (GEC): (1) crossover, and (2) mutation. Crossover creates new candidate solutions by combining bits and pieces of promising solutions, whereas mutation introduces slight perturbations to promising solutions to explore their immediate neighborhood. However, fixed, problem-independent variation operators often fail to effectively exploit important features of high-quality selected solutions. One way to make variation operators more powerful and flexible is to replace traditional variation of GEAs by the following two steps: 1. Build a probabilistic model of the selected promising solutions, and 2. sample the built model to generate a new population of candidate solutions. Algorithms based on this principle are commonly called estimation-of-distribution algorithms (EDAs) but are also known as probabilistic model-building genetic algorithms (PMBGAs) and as iterated density{estimation evolutionary algorithms (IDEAs). The general purpose of this workshop is to present and discuss
  • recent advances in EDAs,
  • new theoretical and empirical results,
  • applications of EDAs, and
  • promising directions for future EDA research.
 
 
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Military and Security Applications of Evolutionary Computation
Laurence Merkle & Misty Blowers
Duration: Full Day

[ further details ]

Almost since its inception, evolutionary computation has been applied to the solution of military problems. Since September 11, 2001, there has been increased interest within the military and security communities in novel techniques for solving challenging problems within their domains. The genesis of this interest lies in the fact that repeated attempts of using traditional techniques have left many important problems unsolved, and in some cases, not addressed.
Additionally, new problems have emerged within the broad areas of the global war on terrorism, homeland security, and force protection that are difficult to tackle with conventional methods, since social, cultural and human behavioral factors tend to be at the heart of these new types of problems. The purpose of the workshop is to continue our discussion of current and ongoing efforts in using genetic and evolutionary computation techniques in attacking military and security problems. These include, but are not limited to the following:

• Genetic and evolutionary techniques in the design of military systems and sub-systems;
• Genetic and evolutionary techniques for logistics and scheduling of military operations;
• Genetic and evolutionary algorithms (GEAs) in strategic planning and tactical decision making;
• Multiobjective GEAs for examining tradeoffs in military, security, and counter-terrorism procedures;
• Automated discovery of tactics and procedures for site security, force protection, and consequence management;
• Genetics-based knowledge discovery and data mining of large databases used to recognize patterns of individual behavior; and
• Co-evolutionary techniques for simultaneous red-blue team strategic-tactical simulation and gaming.
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Undergraduate Student Workshop
Laurence Merkle , Clare Bates Congdon & Frank Moore
Duration: Half Day

[ further details ]

Goals of the workshop include:
  • providing a forum allowing undergraduate students to put a "capstone" on their undergraduate research activities, through presentation of their work at an international conference;
  • encouraging teaching faculty to think about undergraduate research opportunities for their students in the evolutionary computation field;
  • preparing standout undergraduate students for graduate studies in the evolutionary computation field;
  • encouraging more focus on education amongst GECCO participants;
  • recruiting opportunities for faculty at advanced degree granting institutions; and
  • sharing and networking amongst teaching faculty with students participating in undergraduate research.


Learning Classifier Systems (LCS)
Tim Kovacs, Xavier Llorà & Keiki Takadama
Duration: Full Day

[ further details ]

Since Learning Classifier Systems (LCSs) were introduced by Holland as a way of applying evolutionary computation to machine learning problems, the LCS paradigm has broadened greatly into a framework encompassing many representations, rule discovery mechanisms, and credit assignment schemes. Current LCS applications range from data mining to automated innovation to on-line control. Classifier systems are a very active area of research, with newer approaches, in particular Wilson?s accuracy-based XCS, receiving a great deal of attention. LCS are also benefiting from advances in the field of reinforcement learning, and there is a trend toward developing connections between the two areas.

We invite submissions which discuss recent developments in all areas of research on, and applications of, Learning Classifier Systems.

IWLCS is the only event to bring together most of the core researchers in classifier systems. A free introductory tutorial on LCS will be presented at GECCO 2006.

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Adaptive Representations
Marc Toussaint & Edwin de Jong
Duration: Half Day

[ further details ]

Nature has developed an ingenious language to describe organisms: the genetic system. From theory we know that the choice of representation has a crucial influence on the search distribution and the chances to find solutions in a search process. In this view, how can we learn a suitable representation from previous evaluations of samples that will facilitate the search for better solutions? And how can continuous self-adaptation of the representation in evolutionary processes be performed and understood? In this workshop we would like to gather work from different approaches to these questions and initiate a discussion, particularly between people from different theoretical, experimental, or biological backgrounds, aiming at a common framework and language to address such questions.
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(previously known as SEEDS)
Julian Miller , Ivan Garibay , Sanjeev Kumar , Ozlem Garibay & Kivanc Oner
Duration: Full Day

[ further details ]

This workshop follows on from the successful workshops on self-organization in representations in evolutionary algorithms, and scalable, evolvable, emergent developmental systems at previous GECCO conferences. This year's workshop is a unified workshop covering both closely related areas. It promises to be an exciting, thought provoking, and successful workshop.

This workshop will focus on domain-independent methods for representing complex solutions with self-organizable building blocks, and on developmental principles for specifying the construction of complex systems. The workshop welcomes multidisciplinary work, including submissions from biologists on relevant biology that may help shed more light on developmental, self-organizing principles for evolutionary computation.
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One Conference: Many "Mini-Conferences"
Genetic and Evolutionary Computation Conference (GECCO-2006)
 
GECCO is sponsored by the Association for Computing Machinery Special Interest Group on Evolutionary Computation (SIGEVO). ACM SIG Services: 1515 Broadway, New York, NY, 10036, USA, 1-800-342-6626 (USA and Canada) or +212-626-0500 (Global)